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Collaborations


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Collaborations


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Innovators for Purpose

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Favermann Design

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Aldo Tambellini

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metaLAB at Harvard

 

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Innovators For Purpose


A 2017 design apprenticeship program for Cambridge youth 

Innovators For Purpose


A 2017 design apprenticeship program for Cambridge youth 

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Innovators for Purpose

LEAD INSTRUCTOR

Throughout the summer of 2017, I lead 10 apprentices through a human-centered design process to envision wayfinding and placemaking elements that connect local youth to Cambridge’s rich history and its thriving innovation economy. While the building-boom that is ongoing in Cambridge may be improving the city’s landscape, we have found that youth in the Port neighborhood feel invisible and disconnected to that progress. By engaging local students in this wayfinding design project, we connected them to the stories that are developing around them and have showcased their own talents, hopes, and dreams.

The program contained three phases: research, ideation, and project development. Presentations were held each Friday, offering a chance for the apprentices to reflect on what they learned, meet other people involved in implementing the project, and for those stakeholders to remain updated on the project's progress.

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Black infinity in the moment


An avant-garde virtual reality film by Aldo Tambellini

Black infinity in the moment


An avant-garde virtual reality film by Aldo Tambellini

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Aldo Tambellini Art Foundation

DIRECTOR OF NEW INITIATIVES

“Black Infinity in the Moment” is the culmination of the life’s work of Aldo Tambellini, an avant garde artist who has continuously expanded and redefined cinema throughout its history as an experimental art-form. From the age of 6 when he projected a lanterna magica in his home in pre-war Italy, to the 1960’s in New York City where Aldo created cameraless films and became one of the first artists to illuminate buildings with artistic projections, to the advent of television where Aldo worked on the first and second program by artists for broadcast television (Black Gate Cologne 1968, the Medium is the Medium, WGBH Boston, 1969), to his time at MIT in the 1980’s, Aldo has always worked at the bleeding edge of art and technology. Today, at the age of 87, and in collaboration with Daniel Koff and Nicholas Vandenberg, Aldo has reassembled his hand-painted glass slides, film, videos, poetry and sound into a new avant garde virtual reality film experience.

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Favermann Design


Favermann Design


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Favermann Design

Designer

Favermann Design is a non-traditional design firm with a unique combination of design professionals trained in different disciplines. The firm approaches design problems by applying creative tools and approaches to develop an innovative and cost-effective solution for clients. Projects that range from urban design schemes to streetscapes, wayfinding, urban branding, sports events, and functional public art.

 

http://www.favermanndesign.com/

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Beautiful Data II


A 2015 workshop on digital art history supported by the Getty Foundation and produced by the metaLAB at Harvard

Beautiful Data II


A 2015 workshop on digital art history supported by the Getty Foundation and produced by the metaLAB at Harvard

metaLAB at Harvard

EXPERIMENTAL DOCUMENTATION PRODUCER

Carpenter Center for Visual Arts, Harvard, Cambridge MA

Carpenter Center for Visual Arts, Harvard, Cambridge MA

With art museums making both their imagery and collections data open and accessible, the question arises: what to do with it all?

This was the question put to participants in Beautiful Data II, a summer workshop supported by the Getty Research Institute and hosted by metaLAB with the Harvard Art Museums and the Carpenter Center for Visual Arts. For two weeks in July 2016, a gathering of art historians, curators, designers, and technologists forged concepts and skills necessary to make use of open collections to develop art-historical storytelling.

The second annual offering of Beautiful Data, this edition of the workshop focused on “difficult collections” poised on the edge of the digital/material divide—collections that resist ready digitization or exist as ephemeral and hybrid objects and events. Projects pondered data as a medium for art, one with its own curatorial and preservation challenges using data visualization, interactive media, enhanced curatorial description and exhibition practice, digital publication, and data-driven, object-oriented teaching.

The workshop was extensively documented by participants and staff. I was in charge of coordinating the collection of these records and transforming these objects into the production of an experimental online publication. As a provocation, we’ve treated this documentation as data, turning it into an array in JSON, an open data format used widely in web programming. This site visualizes the resulting data set in three ways: styled as content tiles; as “raw” metadata, with cross-referenceable tags visibly linking records; and as a rotary timeline expressing those connections as arcs of adjacency. So although each visualization expresses the same data, its styling and features privilege certain characteristics and connections. Each has its emphases, and its missing elements as well. These interdependent visualizations not only offer a set of mnemonics for our class of participants; they also offer a collective provocation on the multimodal nature of “data” as a concept and norm.

View the project here.

Olin College of Engineering


Olin College of Engineering


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Olin College of Engineering

External Engagement and Impact in Education, 2017

PRODUCER, CINEMATOGRAPHER 

Engineering necessitates a skills in science and technology, so why would an engineering school require its students take a class in human-centered design? This video seeks to answer that question, not only to introduce people to the mechanics of the class, but to convey Olin’s unique pedagogical approach and theory of change. 

At the end of spring 2017, I brought in my longtime collaborator, Nick Vandenberg to assist in the production. We captured faculty and students at work in class, on user visits outside of campus, and seated in studio for interviews. We are currently wrapping up post-production and composing an original score for the short film with a projected release by the end of the year.